Archives for Bard OSF

11 Great Regional Actors named Lunt-Fontanne Fellows

The Ten Chimneys Foundation in Wisconsin, founded by legendary theatre couple Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne, has launched a fellowship program for the nation’s top regional actors. Here’s the description from the foundation’s site: In the summer of 2008, eleven of the most prestigious and accomplished regional theatres in the country were invited to nominate multiple actors for consideration to be named LUNT-FONTANNE FELLOWS. All of the actors who were nominated for this honor: have 20-plus years of experience as professional actors; are widely considered among the top actors in their community; and are widely respected by audiences, directors, and
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OSF Townhall Meeting, Monday October 27, 2008

The Oregon Shakespeare Festival is hosting a free-to-the-public Town Hall Meeting on Monday, October 27 from 7 – 8:30 pm at the Bowmer Theatre in Ashland. Directors Bill Rauch and Paul Nicholson will be onhand, along with other OSF staff, for an open forum discussion. The public was invited to e-mail questions or topics for discussion to townhall@osfashland.org, so here’s what we here at bardolatry sent:
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Oregon Shakespeare Festival’s 2008 Coriolanus

We spent a fair amount of time on OSF’s Othello, so now that we’ve finally been able to catch all three of OSF’s other Shakespeare productions this year—Coriolanus, Comedy of Errors, and A Midsummer Night’s Dream—I thought we should take a moment, before the season ends, to make a couple of quick comments. Next year, I hope, now that we’re all moved into our new homes here in Ashland, we should be able to catch the plays (and post on them) early in the season. Huzzah! First, Coriolanus in the New Theatre, directed by the always excellent Laird Williamson, who
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The Plague of Jealousy: more on Othello at OSF, 2008

Having seen the Oregon Shakespeare Festival’s 2008 production of Othello twice now, I have two strong recommendations: 1) See it while you still can—it only plays in the outdoor Elizabethan through early October, and, 2) Get seats as close to the stage as you can beg, borrow or steal. The Elizabethan is a big outdoor venue, best suited to broad comedy and grand spectacle. The first OSF production I ever saw, in fact, was in the Elizabethan—the 1996 Coriolanus, most memorable to me for the moment, right after intermission, I believe, when Derrick Lee Weeden—be still, my heart!—came rappeling down
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Dan Donohue’s Iago: Consummate “Person of the Lie”

Oregon Shakespeare Festival actor Dan Donohue as Iago wretches and heaves on the outdoor Elizabethan stage, consumed by jealousy. He hates the Moor (title character, Othello). And his hatred sucks the life blood of all he touches. He’s a sort of human “black hole” with a seemingly bottomless capacity to wreck havoc. Lisa Peterson directs the 2008 production of Othello, one of Shakespeare’s five major tragedies. And, a major tragedy it is. Dan Donohue’s Iago has a history; he is human. While the audience doesn’t know much about what makes Donohue’s Iago so cruel and relentless in his pursuit of
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“You’ll never get it right…”

Ever since I began writing The Mystery of Things, I’ve had a fascination for Shakespeare’s villains in general and Iago in particular. It’s the “why?” question, as Dan Donohue, one of our favorite actors, points out in a lively and revealing interview on the Oregon Shakespeare Festival website called “Playing Iago.” My favorite quote, besides “You’ll never get it right,” is this:: “The character Iago is a better actor than I am.” Still, I think we can expect some pretty damned decent acting when Dan’s run as the greatest villain in English literature begins on the OSF Elizabethan stage in
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